American Society of Magazine Editors

Best Cover Contest 2014 Winners & Finalists

News, Politics and Business | Entertainment and Celebrity | Science, Technology and Nature | Sports and Adventure | Women's Service | Fashion and Beauty | Lifestyle | Brainiest | Most Delicious | Sexiest | Cover of the Year | Reader's Choice Award Category Winners | Readers' Choice Award Top 10 Covers | Readers' Choice Award Winner

 

News, Politics and Business
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Winner

Boston, May, We Will Finish the Race

Photographed by Mitch Feinberg
"After the marathon bombings, we wanted to be the magazine the city deserved and needed at that moment. The marathon was just four days before our ship date, but we scratched our cover and main feature and threw ourselves into honoring the runners and victims as best we could. The cover image is made up completely of shoes that ran this year’s marathon, and we were proud to tell their stories. We were even more proud that the sale of our May cover posters raised over $120,000 for the One Fund."

 
 
 
 

Finalist

Bloomberg Businessweek, July 15-21, The Hedge Fund Myth

(Photo illustration by 731)
"High finance and the crisis of masculinity captured in one image. The cover was discussed widely on social media, cable TV, and around water coolers, delivering added attention for Sheelah Kolhatkar’s smart piece."

 

 

Finalist

The New Yorker, July 8 & 15, Moment of Joy

"Moment of Joy," Jack Hunter's image of Bert and Ernie in front of an old-fashioned TV set, celebrates the Supreme Court decision on same-sex marriage. “It’s amazing to witness how attitudes on gay rights have evolved in my lifetime,” the artist says."

 

 

 

Entertainment and Celebrity
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Winner

New York, May 20, Michael Douglas Is Liberace

"If simplicity is the essence of all great covers, then Martin Schoeller nailed this one. The photograph captured iconic actor Michael Douglas for the cover of New York’s annual television issue with just the slightest nod to the character he was playing. The result is a little Michael, a little Lee (as Liberace was known). The unorthodox type treatment complements the picture elegantly and with force."

 

 

 


 

Finalist

Bloomberg Businessweek, December 2–8, J Crew: Teaching the World to Dress American

(Photo illustration by Justin Metz)
"It’s hard to break through with a story about J. Crew—everyone wears it so it has become visual noise. So for our cover story about how J. Crew is expanding overseas, and going after a more fashion-forward demographic, we decided to have Will and Kate, symbols of all that is wholesome and holy and English, posing as J. Crew catalog models on our cover."

 

Finalist

The New York Times Magazine, December 29, The Lives They Lived

Photographer: Henry Leutwyler
Designer: Arem Duplessis
"For our annual Lives They Lived issue, we commissioned the photographer Henry Leutwyler to shoot a portfolio of personal effects of famous people who died in 2013. We featured James Gandolfini’s beloved Cadillac convertible on the cover. Shot from behind, the car is a moving point of entry for the issue."

 

Science, Technology and Nature
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Winner

Bloomberg Businessweek, December 9–15, How Blackberry Became a Relic

(Photographs from various museums and art libraries)
"Nothing ages faster than handset technology, which made this cover about the rapid decline of BlackBerry very easy to conceptualize."

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Finalist

Audubon, May–June, Up in the Air

"Remarkably, Audubon's May-June 2013 cover is the first flight sequence in its 115 year history. A contemporary version of a Muybridge, the Roseate Spoonbill was photographed by John Huba and designed as a grid meant to celebrate the spectacle of color and flight and movement, as well as the bird's struggle to land in an overdeveloped South Florida. With elegantly spare typography aligned to reinforce the grid."

 

Finalist

The New York Times Magazine, May 19, The Secret Lives of Germs

Photographer: Hannah Whitaker
Designer: Arem Duplessis
"This cover story by Michael Pollen argues that while we have been obsessed with eradicating germs, there are health advantages to being exposed to them. The cover shot by Hannah Whitaker of a baby being licked by a dog makes graphic the prevalence of germs in our everyday lives."

 

Sports and Adventure
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Winner

Sports Illustrated, April 22, BOSTON

Photographer: John Tlumacki
"At approximately 3:10 on the afternoon of April 15, 2013, the editors of Sports Illustrated returned from their Monday meeting to rumors of a terrorist act near the finish line of the Boston Marathon. With fewer than four hours until Si's weekly deadline, producing a definitive news account of what happened was impossible. Was there, however, an image that captured the afternoon's chaos, its tragedy, in addition to a city's capacity for resilience and goodness in the face of such terror? Yes, there was, dozens of images, in fact. By 4:30 p.m., half an hour ahead of the magazine's usual cover deadline, (Read More)

 
 

Finalist

ESPN The Magazine, September 16, Floyd Mayweather in The Fight Issue

"Benjamin Lowy’s photograph of Floyd Mayweather wasn’t intended to be a cover; he took this shot for what we call a “technique shot.” Yet when we saw the defending champ demonstrating his famous shoulder roll, we knew it had to be the cover of our Fight Issue, one with profiles and separate covers of Mayweather and his opponent Canelo Alvarez. We decided to go with a bright white background—a rarity for The Magazine—to contrast the fighter’s dark skin, showing off the beads of sweat on his forehead and intense concentration in his eyes. We offer this cover as an athlete who is the embodiment of his craft in a rare moment when boxing rose to the top of the sports conversation."
 

Finalist

The New York Times Magazine, November 24, The Flight Risk

Photographer: Martin Schoeller
Designer: Arem Duplessis
"For this cover story on the U.S. women’s ski-jumping team, we featured the Olympic hopeful Sarah Hendrickson as photographed by Martin Schoeller. Schoeller captures the competitive spirit of Hendrickson, who wears her competition gear, in her body posture and intense gaze."

 

Finalist

Runner's World, December, Get Fit Have Fun

"This year, running went social in a new way. Idiosyncratic running tribes popped up all over the country, powered by social media and populated by young runners looking to get fit, but also have fun, make new friends, and participate-in person!-in something audacious. The face of this trend was November Project, founded in Boston by two former college rowers looking to stay in shape through the cold winter. So we had Guido Vitti shoot 14 NP members (and one dog) in a group setting that highlighted fitness and fun. To emphasize how big a story this was in running (and to have more creative fun ourselves), we ran the images across four pages of a gatefold cover."

 

Women's Service
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Winner

O, The Oprah Magazine, September, Hair!

"It just might be one of the great hair days of all time. For O, The Oprah Magazine’s September 2013 hair-a-palooza issue, photographer Ruven Afanador captured Oprah Winfrey radiant in a magnificent Afro. (As was widely reported, the wig, which Oprah christened “Wild Thang,” weighed about the same as a Chihuahua.) The cover sparked “’Froprah” mania, garnering 337,346,650 media impressions; Oprah’s Instagram of the image drew some 75,000 likes in 24 hours. After 13 years and more than 160 issues with the same cover model (how’s that for a challenge?), O can still surprise, delight, and pump up the volume like nobody else."

 

Finalist

Brides, October/November, Get Inspired!

"The October/November issue of BRIDES magazine marked our first-ever flip cover. The front cover featured a beautiful bride in a delicately ornate wedding gown and whimsical bouquet, and the back cover featured a close up on a stunning veiled woman. The back cover focused on the woman’s facial attributes for our special bonus Beauty Issue, which included a step-by-step beauty regimen to help women look and feel their best for their big day. BRIDES is the ultimate resource for brides to planning and enjoying every step toward their big day and beyond."
 

Finalist

Real Simple, October, Your Ultimate Fall Planner

"World­‐class still life photographer Stephen Lewis takes remarkable pictures of animals. For this shot, the curious one-­‐ year-­‐old kitten Tajari patiently sat in our carved pumpkin for minutes at a time, just watching the activity around him. No photoshop, no retouching. Just an adorable kitten. Styled by Ariana Salvato."

 

 

Fashion and Beauty
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Winner

W, December/January, The Art Issue

"For W’s December/January Art Issue, the magazine collaborated with artist Yayoi Kusama to create this iconic cover image depicting George Clooney. The visually arresting image is the highlight of the cover story, for which five leading female artists were invited to create interpretive portraits of the actor. Clooney wears a suit painted by Kusama with her signature polka dots and stands against a polka-dotted backdrop. Planned to coincide with the opening of an exhibition of new work by Kusama at David Zwirner Gallery, the cover makes a powerful reference to the artist’s iconic self-portraits."

 

 

Finalist

Harper's Bazaar, May, Summer Fashion Issue

"The May issue unveiled not only summer’s essentials but also our cover star Gwyneth Paltrow, in a breathtaking Dior couture headpiece. Shot by Daniel Jackson, the image paid homage to a Richard Avedon photograph that appeared in BAZAAR’s April 1965 issue—revealing that in fashion, history is worth reliving."

 

Finalist

New York, February 18–25, Spring Fashion

"New York’s “Spring Fashion” cover with actress Elle Fanning has artist Will Cotton revisiting Johannes Vermeer’s famous painting “Girl With a Pearl Earring” in pose, expression, and lighting, while Fanning’s Vivienne Westwood–inspired headpiece made of icing and designed by Cotton prepares readers for the stunning “Candy Land” portfolio inside the magazine. Cotton has been using candy in his artwork “as a metaphor for pure pleasure” since the late nineties, and used spring looks as inspiration for New York."

 

Lifestyle
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Winner

Bloomberg Pursuits, Spring, Where Luxury Begins (and Ends)

"Like the proverbial snake eating its own tail, the Spring 2013 cover of Bloomberg Pursuits depicts a live alligator with an alligator wallet clamped slyly in its jaws. The cover line—“Where Luxury Begins (and Ends)”—doesn’t just wittily echo photographer Jamie Chung’s arresting image, it perfectly captures the story inside: a photo portfolio that highlights the raw materials behind our most luxurious goods. For those disquieted by the notion of sacrificing creatures for our consumables, our “Behind the Scenes” on page 12 reports that the efforts of the fashion industry actually saved Alligator mississippiensis from extinction."

 

Finalist

The Fader, February/March, Solange

"When shooting Solange Knowles for The FADER, we wanted to reference her timeless songwriting, and emphasize her classic presence in the image. This cover was shot with an Bx 10 View Camera for a simple, timeless vibe, bringing only SO plates of film to capture the perfect shot (compared to a standard 2,000-shot digital sitting). We took many conservative, close up shots of Solange, but still wanted that final, bold image. We chose yellow as the backdrop, because it paired well with the natural lighting from the windows and the contrast of colors in her outfit. Solange stepped onto the apple box herself, and the shot we chose was the very last plate of film."
 

Finalist

Los Angeles, April, How to Afford LA

"Los Angeles has one of the highest costs of living of any city in the world, and it's only getting worse. A fundamental question Angelenos ask themselves is: Can I afford to live here? Los Angeles magazine explored the topic in its April issue. At the root of the discussion is, of course, money, so design director Steven E. Banks enlisted typographer Daniel Pelavin to riff on a good ol' American dollar bill for the cover image. Mimicking fonts and filigree, it conveys the message with immediacy. Look closely and you may even spot a hidden spider, just like the real stuff."

 

Brainiest
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Winner

Bloomberg Businessweek, November 11–17, The Surprising Sophistication of Twitter

(Illustration by David Parkins)
"This issue was released on Twitter’s IPO day and included a cover story by Paul Ford about the surprisingly sophisticated technology behind the service’s 140-character messages. We reviewed magazines from the 1920’s and channeled Henry Luce to create this cover—even aging our logo. "

 

 

 


 

Finalist

The Chronicle Review, May 24, Scholars in Bondage

"New CEO, Mike Riley started his new job the week we closed this issue. It was with a degree of nervousness that we showed him our selected cover images for this essay about how dogma dominates studies of kink. We had commissioned Matt Roth to take photographs of predictable imagery—close-ups of women wearing stiletto heels, pushup bras and fishnet stockings. Matt came back with a series of shots of a couple he knew that practiced roping. We were compelled by the artistry of Matt’s photograph, and intrigued by the beauty of the knots and roping patterns. Mike signed off on the cover—an interesting twist for the new boss’s first week!"
 

Finalist

Texas Monthly, February, Welcome to Big City, Texas!

"Our February issue marked our fortieth anniversary, and we knew we had to go big. With three Texas cities ranking among the ten-largest in the U.S., we knew it was time to devote an issue to our beloved Texas cities. We tapped Kent Matheson, a 3D Background Artist who has worked on movies such as Elysium and Avatar, to bring all the skylines of our six major cities to life in a massive overtaking of the state. True to form, he created a whole new world, with a million tiny details that make this cover one where you see something new each time you glance at it."


Finalist

Wired, December, Bill Gates Wants You to Fix the World

"It isn't every month that we have the opportunity to feature both Bill Gates and Bill Clinton on our cover. But rather than an overblown portrait, we went with this intimate, sophisticated image. Gates and Clinton sit at one end of a table, imploring the reader to join them. It is an inviting and altogether fitting way to introduce an issue intended to inspire our audience to follow their philanthropic example."

 

 

Most Delicious
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Winner

Food & Wine, August, Vegetables Now

"The cover of the August issue, one of F&W's best sellers of 2013, announces a huge trend: the immense creativity that chefs and other inspired cooks are bringing to vegetables. Reflecting just how people want to eat in the heat of summer, the cover image is a vibrant-­‐looking vegetable "ceviche" (a chopped salad marinated in a lime-­‐juice dressing); it's a brilliant recipe by a pair of influential food bloggers in Sweden. The words "Vegetables now" run across the platter, a bold statement that doesn't take itself too seriously (the curves of the script echo the tendrils of a vine and the platter's scalloped edges). The stacked type that runs down the right-­‐ hand side resembles a sign you might see at a farm stand, another reference to the vegetable theme. Everything from the sky-­‐blue backdrop to the juicy nectarine slices captures the essence of a perfect summer meal."
 

Finalist

The New York Times Magazine, November 3, Broccoli's Image Makeover

Photographer: Horacio Salinas
Designer: Arem Duplessis
"The cover story for our Health issue explored how to market healthful food in America. Broccoli, the vegetable that Americans love to hate, is the cover subject. The photographer Horacio Salinas put broccoli in a barber’s chair, playfully illustrating the idea of a makeover."
 

Finalist

Texas Monthly, June, The 50 Best BBQ Joints . . . in the World!

"Every five years, we are tasked with not only ranking the top fifty barbecue joints in the state (pass the Tums, please) but also with coming up with a cover to make our readers drool. To help with the latter, the owner of our number one joint, Aaron Franklin, arranged a heaping tray of his finest meats, while creative director T.J. Tucker painstakingly hand-lettered typography drawn by Jon Contino in barbecue sauce. The rest was left to photographer Wyatt McSpadden, who captured the full scene in all its glory. If this cover isn’t the definition of food porn, we don’t know what is."

 

Sexiest
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Winner

Vanity Fair, October, 100 Years

"For Vanity Fair's October Issue-to honor the magazine's birth 100 years ago, in 1913-sexy was the word as we resurrected a Monroe pose and introduced a new logo (smart, slim, serif!). Not to be outdone by the magazine's stately new font, model Kate Upton channeled screen icon Marilyn Monroe as she pouted and posed with a congratulatory birthday cake for photographer Annie Leibovitz. Happy Birthday, indeed."

 


 

 

 

Finalist

ESPN The Magazine, July 22, Kenneth Faried in The Body Issue

"Denver Nuggets forward Kenneth Faried is one of eight athletes whose awe-inspiring physiques we feature on the gatefold of ESPN The Magazine’s annual Body Issue. Carlos Serrao captures Faried’s grace, beauty and power as he strides down a basketball court, his braids flying behind him, lit by natural light. We chose a cool gray background on the cover to contrast Faried’s light skin tones to present a man whose body is too beautiful not to be shared."
 

Finalist

GQ, February, Beyoncé

"When someone’s album is iTunes’ fastest seller ever worldwide—when they’re the most prolific pop star of the twenty-first century and married to some guy named Jay Z—offering them a cover is pretty much a no-brainer. But pulling off the first photo shoot after Queen Bey delivered her daughter wasn’t such an easy task. Luckily, Terry Richardson was up for the job. Beyoncé embodies many things: sexiness, power, humility, and damn good music. But with the GQ logo above her head, we’d like to think that she represents confidence most of all. Confidence males and females alike can channel, whether they’re attempting to take over the airwaves or simply stand out at the workplace."

 

Cover of the Year
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Winner

Boston, May, We Will Finish the Race

Photographed by Mitch Feinberg
"After the marathon bombings, we wanted to be the magazine the city deserved and needed at that moment. The marathon was just four days before our ship date, but we scratched our cover and main feature and threw ourselves into honoring the runners and victims as best we could. The cover image is made up completely of shoes that ran this year’s marathon, and we were proud to tell their stories. We were even more proud that the sale of our May cover posters raised over $120,000 for the One Fund."

 

 

 

 

Best Cover Contest Readers' Choice Award 
Voting for the ASME Best Contest Readers’ Choice Award began on Facebook on Monday, January 13, 2014, and ended on Sunday, April 13, 2014. A new category was posted every Monday through March 17. The top 10 entries were posted for two weeks from March 31 to April 13. The most “liked” cover won the ASME Best Cover Contest Readers’ Choice Award. 

Readers' Choice Award Category Winners

News, Politics and Business

Ms., Fall, Fed Up!

"To illustrate our cover story on the powerful new national movement of fast-food workers--who have been striking for a higher minimum wage--we wanted to make a parallel with the hardworking "Rosie the Riveters" of World War II. So art director Brandi Phipps updated and parodied the original J. Howard Miller illustration, this time dressing "Rosie" as a fast-food worker, and turning the "smile" from McDonald's "happy meals" upside down. As a fast-food worker activist put it to us, "You nailed it; it's hard work. The symbolism was very powerful--telling the everyday story of the fast-food worker."
 

Entertainment and Celebrity

Atlanta, November, Nobody's Safe

"The Walking Dead, the most popular drama on cable television, also happens to be filmed exclusively in metro Atlanta. Which made the show a no-brainer (no pun intended) for our cover. We reached out to the films' stars— Andrew Lincoln and Norman Reedus—months in advance, hoping we could shoot them right in our own backyard. Naturally the only time their schedules overlapped was 2,500 miles away in Hollywood, so we organized a last-minute shoot there, hiring not just stylists and makeup artists for the subjects, but also body part models whose hands were zombified by a special makeup artist. We originally envisioned one cover with both Lincoln and Reedus, but once photographer John Russo shot them individually, we knew we had to do a split run. It was the right call; the show's rabid fans are still contacting us from around the world, wanting us to mail them both covers."
 

Science, Technology and Nature

ScienceNews, July 13, Bohr's Vision

"For an essay celebrating the 100th anniversary of Niels Bohr’s revolutionary theory of the atom, Asst. Art Director Stephen Egts created a composite portrait of Bohr out of the simple structure that the physicist proposed – a dense, positively charged nucleus containing nearly all of the atom's mass surrounded by electrons traveling in specific allowed orbits. Egts colorized an image of Bohr and overlaid hundreds of hydrogen atoms of different sizes and rotations. The spectrum of colors in the background represents Bohr’s breakthrough realization that as electrons jump between fixed orbits around the nucleus, specific wavelengths of light are emitted."
 

Sports and Adventure

Skiing, January/February, The Skier's 65

Designer: Eleanor Williamson
"After spending six hours one night last February in Utah's Wasatch mountains shooting with Salt Lake City photographer Steve Lloyd, skier Kevin Brower was finished. Toast. Done with the shoot. But Lloyd still wasn’t satisfied. “I begged him to do just one more,” Lloyd says. Brower grudgingly acquiesced, Lloyd clicked from a new angle, and magic was made. Beyond cajoling his talent, Lloyd had to configure a complex four-source light setup and match the timing of Brower’s movements. “Of any night shot I’ve ever taken,” Lloyd says, “this is the one I’m most proud of.”
 

Women's Service

Parents, February, Show Your Love!

"Three-year-old Emily Keicher is adorable. She also has spina bifida, and will probably never walk on her own. This is the first time that a child with a disability has been on a Parents cover, and we got a tremendous amount of positive feedback. The special-needs community celebrated the fact that Emily wasn't chosen to illustrate an article about disabilities, but simply because she's a cute kid with a smile as shiny as her walker. Thayer Allyson Gowdy initially photographed Emily for a crafts article in the issue, but our photo director saw those pictures and realized she was cover-worthy."
 

Fashion and Beauty

Harper's Bazaar, September, Sarah Jessica Parker

"In Bazaar’s biggest issue ever, Sarah Jessica Parker ushered in the fall season. Clad in Chanel and a feathered headpiece by Ellen Christine Couture, it’s clear why Parker is fashion’s queen bee. The stunning image shot by Terry Richardson showed that what’s essential in fashion is a bit of fun."
 

 

Lifestyle

The Fader, February/March, Solange

"When shooting Solange Knowles for The FADER, we wanted to reference her timeless songwriting, and emphasize her classic presence in the image. This cover was shot with an Bx 10 View Camera for a simple, timeless vibe, bringing only SO plates of film to capture the perfect shot (compared to a standard 2,000-shot digital sitting). We took many conservative, close up shots of Solange, but still wanted that final, bold image. We chose yellow as the backdrop, because it paired well with the natural lighting from the windows and the contrast of colors in her outfit. Solange stepped onto the apple box herself, and the shot we chose was the very last plate of film."
 

Brainiest

America's Quarterly, Fall, Freedom of Expression in the Americas

"This cover submitted was for our Fall issue on Freedom of Expression in the Americas. We wanted a simple, arresting image to capture the importance and human aspect of the subject. Our Artistic Director, Donald Partyka, used an existing photo from Getty Images, cropping it and giving it an illustrative treatment and projecting an exaggerated halftone screen over the image. For the cover lines he used the open type version of Erik van Blokland's typeface "Trixie," which mimics the variation of ink on a typewriter ribbon giving it a true crime look to convey the darkness and gravity of the subject."
 

Most Delicious

Sauce, June, Meet the Stud of Summer

"For this cover image, photographer Greg Rannells par-boiled a 32-pound octopus to turn its brown tentacles bright magenta. The sea creature was still steaming hot when Rannells snapped a close-up of one of its twisted tentacles. The photo captured the beauty of an underwater beast that has often been underappreciated as seafood, but was trending this summer in haute gastronomic circles across the country. This cover image hooked readers into a feature story titled “Summer Stud,” which highlighted six stunning octopus dishes at St. Louis restaurants."
 

Sexiest

Cosmopolitan, March, Miley Cyrus

"This March 2013 cover launched a new Miley Cyrus and a new era at Cosmopolitan. The look-at-me cover—the first from Editor-in-Chief Joanna Coles—was photographed by Matthias Vriens-McGrath and re-established Cosmo as the epicenter of everything that matters to young women. Fun, fearless, and proud of her cover, Cyrus tweeted: "Let's play a game! All my fans go and put my @Cosmopolitan in front of all the magazines at the store!!!!!! Send me pics haha!" This "coverjack" of newsstands resulted in nearly 1.1 million copies sold. Cosmo, like Miley, can't stop, won't stop pushing the limits."


Readers' Choice Award Top 10 Covers

Atlanta, November, Nobody's Safe

"The Walking Dead, the most popular drama on cable television, also happens to be filmed exclusively in metro Atlanta. Which made the show a no-brainer (no pun intended) for our cover. We reached out to the films' stars— Andrew Lincoln and Norman Reedus—months in advance, hoping we could shoot them right in our own backyard. Naturally the only time their schedules overlapped was 2,500 miles away in Hollywood, so we organized a last-minute shoot there, hiring not just stylists and makeup artists for the subjects, but also body part models whose hands were zombified by a special makeup artist. We originally envisioned one cover with both Lincoln and Reedus, but once photographer John Russo shot them individually, we knew we had to do a split run. It was the right call; the show's rabid fans are still contacting us from around the world, wanting us to mail them both covers."
 

Cosmopolitan, March, Miley Cyrus

"This March 2013 cover launched a new Miley Cyrus and a new era at Cosmopolitan. The look-at-me cover—the first from Editor-in-Chief Joanna Coles—was photographed by Matthias Vriens-McGrath and re-established Cosmo as the epicenter of everything that matters to young women. Fun, fearless, and proud of her cover, Cyrus tweeted: "Let's play a game! All my fans go and put my @Cosmopolitan in front of all the magazines at the store!!!!!! Send me pics haha!" This "coverjack" of newsstands resulted in nearly 1.1 million copies sold. Cosmo, like Miley, can't stop, won't stop pushing the limits."
 

Skiing, January/February, The Skier's 65

Designer: Eleanor Williamson
"After spending six hours one night last February in Utah's Wasatch mountains shooting with Salt Lake City photographer Steve Lloyd, skier Kevin Brower was finished. Toast. Done with the shoot. But Lloyd still wasn’t satisfied. “I begged him to do just one more,” Lloyd says. Brower grudgingly acquiesced, Lloyd clicked from a new angle, and magic was made. Beyond cajoling his talent, Lloyd had to configure a complex four-source light setup and match the timing of Brower’s movements. “Of any night shot I’ve ever taken,” Lloyd says, “this is the one I’m most proud of.”

OUT, November, Josh Hutcherson

"The magnetic image of a young movie star glancing over his shoulder did not need any embellishment. A muted color scheme and opaque logo was designed to showcase the ’50s-inspired photo."

 

 

 

 

Runner's World, December, Get Fit Have Fun

"This year, running went social in a new way. Idiosyncratic running tribes popped up all over the country, powered by social media and populated by young runners looking to get fit, but also have fun, make new friends, and participate-in person!-in something audacious. The face of this trend was November Project, founded in Boston by two former college rowers looking to stay in shape through the cold winter. So we had Guido Vitti shoot 14 NP members (and one dog) in a group setting that highlighted fitness and fun. To emphasize how big a story this was in running (and to have more creative fun ourselves), we ran the images across four pages of a gatefold cover."

The Fader, February/March, Solange

 

"When shooting Solange Knowles for The FADER, we wanted to reference her timeless songwriting, and emphasize her classic presence in the image. This cover was shot with an Bx 10 View Camera for a simple, timeless vibe, bringing only SO plates of film to capture the perfect shot (compared to a standard 2,000-shot digital sitting). We took many conservative, close up shots of Solange, but still wanted that final, bold image. We chose yellow as the backdrop, because it paired well with the natural lighting from the windows and the contrast of colors in her outfit. Solange stepped onto the apple box herself, and the shot we chose was the very last plate of film."

DuJour, Spring, Kim Kardashian

"At his Florida compound, Bruce Weber embraced the challenge of creating a new look for the omnipresent star Kim Kardashian. On this cover her beauty is lustrous but simple, enhanced by the vivid colors of a Van Gogh garden, slightly shadowed. Weber was inspired by another icon of femininity, Elizabeth Taylor, in how he captured Kardashian, but he capped it with a playful twist: a headband of hibiscus, fashioned exclusively for this shoot."
 

Parents, February, Show Your Love!

"Three-year-old Emily Keicher is adorable. She also has spina bifida, and will probably never walk on her own. This is the first time that a child with a disability has been on a Parents cover, and we got a tremendous amount of positive feedback. The special-needs community celebrated the fact that Emily wasn't chosen to illustrate an article about disabilities, but simply because she's a cute kid with a smile as shiny as her walker. Thayer Allyson Gowdy initially photographed Emily for a crafts article in the issue, but our photo director saw those pictures and realized she was cover-worthy."

The New York Times Magazine, October 6, Harry Who?

Photographer: Richard Burbridge
Designer: Arem Duplessis
"This classic Richard Burbridge portrait of Danielle Radcliffe, shot in his trademark heightened black-and-white style, reveals a grown-up Radcliffe not yet at ease with his fame. The extended ascenders and descenders in the typography reference the Harry Potter logo and also serve as a framing device for the image."

 

Vogue, March, Power Issue

"Vogue’s annual Power issue features the actors, musicians, and personalities at the top of the cultural heap, and in 2013 no one held more social currency than Vogue’s March cover girl, Beyoncé. For his spare but glamorous portrait, Patrick Demarchelier seems to capture all of the singer, business mogul, fashion icon, wife, and, mother’s multi-hyphenated talent and beauty in a single snap. It’s a picture as formidable, yet likeable, as “Queen Bey” herself."

 

 

Readers' Choice Award 

Winner

Atlanta, November, Nobody's Safe

"The Walking Dead, the most popular drama on cable television, also happens to be filmed exclusively in metro Atlanta. Which made the show a no-brainer (no pun intended) for our cover. We reached out to the films' stars— Andrew Lincoln and Norman Reedus—months in advance, hoping we could shoot them right in our own backyard. Naturally the only time their schedules overlapped was 2,500 miles away in Hollywood, so we organized a last-minute shoot there, hiring not just stylists and makeup artists for the subjects, but also body part models whose hands were zombified by a special makeup artist. We originally envisioned one cover with both Lincoln and Reedus, but once photographer John Russo shot them individually, we knew we had to do a split run. It was the right call; the show's rabid fans are still contacting us from around the world, wanting us to mail them both covers."

 

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