The Association of Magazine Media

Tuesday, January 3, 2017

Forbes Reaches Record U.S. Traffic, Credits Mobile Users
Recent comScore data reveals Forbes’ U.S. mobile traffic in November propelled the site to a new record, affirming publishers’ investments this year in mobile.
Amid Election Turmoil, Teen Vogue Finds a Viral Voice: Even Dan Rather Is Paying Attention.
“Twenty-sixteen will be remembered for many things, but one of those may be that it was the year that American journalism got a much-needed spine transplant — perhaps too belatedly for election coverage, but nonetheless,” legendary journalist Dan Rather wrote in a Facebook note today. “I have noted on this page that there have been some surprising new sources of serious reporting — such as Teen Vogue — and some of the more legendary journalistic enterprises seem to be hitting their stride.”
Hearst Magazines UK Restructures Commercial Team to Sell Across Brands
In an interview with Campaign, CRO Duncan Chater said that the commercial teams will be split into sectors so that they can cross-sell against different brands. Hearst publishes titles including Cosmopolitan, Good Housekeeping and Men's Health.
More Exclusives from InStyle's February Cover Story
Gwyneth Paltrow hopes she’s "contributed something positive" to divorce culture; She believes her ex-husband Chris Martin would take a bullet for her.
Women's Health Magazine Explains That There's an Upside to "Eating Like an Animal"
Cathryne Keller, Women’s Health magazine Senior Associate Editor, appeared on CBS New York to discuss diet tips we can adopt from our animal friends for healthier eating in the New Year: Birds spend three-quarters of their lives consuming food but never get fat, so who better to go to for diet advice than animals.
The Crown's New Year Honours 2017: Anna Wintour and Ray Davies on the List
Anna Wintour, who has edited U.S. Vogue for almost 30 years, has received a damehood and Ray Davies has been knighted.
MPA Magazine Media Spotlight: The Legend of Prince’s Special Custom-Font Symbol Floppy Disks
From New York media's select/all: In 1993, Prince frustrated contract lawyers and computer users everywhere when he changed his name to glyph known as “The Love Symbol.” Though he never said so explicitly, it’s generally understood that the name change was attempt to stick it to his record label, Warner Bros., which now had to deal with a top-tier artist with a new, unpronounceable, untypeable name. But it wasn’t just Warner Bros. that had a problem: The Love Symbol proved frustrating for people who wanted to both speak and write about Prince. Writers, editors, and layout designers at magazines and newspapers wouldn’t be able to type the actual name of the Artist Formerly Known As Prince. So Prince did the only thing you could do in that situation: He had a custom-designed font distributed to news outlets on a floppy disk.
Forbes Launches a Snapchat Popup Channel on Discover
Forbes is using Snapchat to reveal part of its “30 under 30” list of 600 influential entrepreneurs, marking the first time the publisher is releasing one of its major franchises on a social network ahead of its own property.
Forbes Names 30 Under 30
Chris O'Shea writes: "The annual feature comes packed with plenty of young people that promise to stoke your inner fears and sense of jealousy."
Men’s Health Cover Features Men’s Health Staffer
For the first time in Men’s Health’s 29-year history, the cover features a Men’s Health staffer.
Rising Stars: Yoonj Kim on How Playboy Is Breaking New Ground in Video
Yoonj Kim’s career in media began with a tweet. Currently a producer at Playboy, she’d just graduated college when an op-ed she wrote on race in the media industry was picked up by The Washington Post. The story was sent out on social media and producer Mitch Koss saw it on Twitter.
How to Fight Fake News and Misinformation? Research Helps Point the Way
Marketers Embrace Native, Favor Social Providers
Robb Report Now Has 2 Gilded Owners
Hare: It’s Time to Stop Saying "Old Media"
The Kelly Awards are given to agency creative teams, advertising clients and magazine media publishers whose campaigns demonstrate both creative excellence and effectiveness in meeting campaign objectives. Award categories include: Best Print Magazine Creative, Best Magazine Media Creative/Campaign and Best Custom Magazine Media Program. Winners will be announced at the American Magazine Media Conference in New York City on February 8, 2017. Deadline is January 6, 2017. Apply now!
MPA–The Association of Magazine Media has released its 2016/17 Magazine Media Factbook today, the definitive source of magazine media research. Since 1985, MPA has been compiling and packaging the most compelling and comprehensive facts and figures around magazine media. Derived from third-party sources and MPA’s own research and data collection, the new Factbook has nearly 100 pages of current and useful information. “Nothing informs a discussion better than solid data,” said MPA’s President and Chief Executive Officer Linda Thomas Brooks, “and the 2016/17 Magazine Media Factbook has plenty of conversation starters. The research continues to show that magazine media is the most trusted, inspiring and influential of all media, and several new studies provide even more proof of magazine media’s unique ability to drive sales.”
February 08, 2017
Conrad New York
Contact Alison Heisler, aheisler@magazine.org or 212-872-3740, for details and custom opportunities.
February 08, 2017
Conrad New York

From New York media's select/all: In 1993, Prince frustrated contract lawyers and computer users everywhere when he changed his name to glyph known as “The Love Symbol.” Though he never said so explicitly, it’s generally understood that the name change was attempt to stick it to his record label, Warner Bros., which now had to deal with a top-tier artist with a new, unpronounceable, untypeable name. But it wasn’t just Warner Bros. that had a problem: The Love Symbol proved frustrating for people who wanted to both speak and write about Prince. Writers, editors, and layout designers at magazines and newspapers wouldn’t be able to type the actual name of the Artist Formerly Known As Prince. So Prince did the only thing you could do in that situation: He had a custom-designed font distributed to news outlets on a floppy disk.