Running with LTB

From the desk of Linda Thomas Brooks, President and CEO, MPA

The Long Run

Whenever I’m asked to describe myself, I usually don’t get too far down the list of adjectives before I say “I’m a runner.”  Over the years, I’ve run five marathons and countless shorter races. I’ve run in cities all over the world, on tracks, through trails, and way too many miles on treadmills. I’ve contributed substantially to Asics’ revenue, as I typically run through three pairs of shoes each year. Part of my self-identify is tied to being a runner. Read more.


Keep a Knockin' But You Can't Come In

As marketers, we often conflate the fact that we CAN do something with the idea that we SHOULD do something.  Because technology allows us to deliver frequent, sometimes incessant messages to consumers via email or text does not mean that we should do that.  As an industry, we need to think about appropriate frequency, compelling messages, and how contextual relevance can create a sense of inspiration and desire in our targeted consumers. Read more.  

Bashing Magazines Doesn't Help Any of Us

Usually I ignore the latest "magazines are dead" trope and don't waste my time responding to stories that use a small sample of data to provide a misleading narrative. The idea of trashing someone else to make yourself look better is as old as junior high school, yet it continues in many businesses, including the media business. Why, as an industry, do we perpetuate the "demise of print" discourse? And why can't we embrace the evolution of magazine media in its many forms? Read more.  

All Content Is Not Created Equal

Fake news is nothing new. Merriam-Webster traces the use of the term as far back as the 1890s, and the concept of fabricated stories existed even long before then. With the invention of the printing press, it became significantly easier to spread news and information. But was that news and information true? There were no editors. There were no reporters. There were no fact checkers. It was up to readers to decide what they believed, whether a story told them that the earth was round or that their neighbor was a witch. And as human beings, we are wired to automatically and effortlessly believe what people tell us. Neuroscience shows us that it takes an extra mental step to question a statement. For our brains, it’s cognitively easier to simply accept what we are told and move on. Read more